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Conceptos Tema 2 Lite 2.2

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Título del test:
Conceptos Tema 2 Lite 2.2

Descripción:
Romantic Poetry

Autor:
RMS
(Otros tests del mismo autor)

Fecha de Creación:
21/05/2022

Categoría:
UNED

Número preguntas: 91
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Temario:
A poem by a Romantic poet belonging to the "Second Generation"; it tells the story of "a hero" born in Seville, whose father was "a true hidalgo" and whose mother was "a learned lady".
The full name of the person addressed in these lines from a key Romantic poem: "May I behold in thee what I was once/ My dear, dear Sister!.
A label used to refer collectively to three poets who wrote, among other poems: "Ode to the West Wind", "Ode on a Grecian Urn" and "Don Juan".
A label used to designate the following poets: P.B. Shelley, Lord Byron and John Keats.
The utopian project- devised by the Romantic poets Coleridge and Southey- to set up an egalitarian community in America.
The name of the ideal democratic community in America planned by Coleridge and Southey.
An utopian project promoted by the Romantic poets S.T. Coleridge and Robert Southey; the objective was to set a democratic community in America.
The term used to refer to a group of poets attacked by Byron in the "Preface" to Canto I of his Don Juan.
A group of English poets considered part of the Romantic Movement, who lived in the Lake District of Northern England in the early years of the 19th century.
- Of Wordsworth, Southey and Coleridge; they were grouped together as_________by Francis Jeffrey, in a review of Coleridge's Biographia Literariafor the Edinburgh Review poets, who all lived in the _____District of north-west England and formed a coherent school of poetry.
A character type associated with the most charismatic Romantic poet; isolated, courageous, independent, tormented. Harold in childe Harold's Pilgrimage is the perfect example.
One of the second generation poets developed this persona of the alienated "_________" in a series of highly popular Eastern Tales, the most famous of which are The Giaour, The Corsair and the poetic drama Manfred and Childe Harold.
Taine called: "ruling personage, the model that contemporaries invest with their admiration and sympathy" it is first sketched in the opening canto of Childe Harld.
Fully developed in Mandred, he is an alien, mysterious, and gloomy spirit, superior in his passions and powers to the common run of humanity, whom he regards with disdain.
A Romantic Author whose work includes an orientalist tale, a poetic drama and an unfinished narrrative poem with a striking satirical component most popular poet of the Romantic age, comic epic: Don Juan.
The personality cult of the most popular of the English Romantics, who enjoyed not only commercial success, but also celebrity and notoriety that were unprecedented and spread all over Europe (before and after the famous poet's death).
The title of a collection of essays by William Hazlitt, as well as a phrase used to refer to the transformations introduced by the Romantic era.
An expression used to describe the bold innovation, intense individualism and questioning of neoclassicism that characterised Romantic poetry. William Hazlitt chose this phrase as the title of a collection of essays.
An expression used to describe the bold innovation, intense individualism and questioning of neoclassicism that characterised Romantic poetry. William Hazlitt chose this phrase as the title of a collection of essays.
The major dramatic form for Romantic writers; drama to be read rather than performed. Examples are Byron's Manfred (1817) or The Tow Foscari (1821).
The major dramatic form for Romantic writers was this, allow the writer more freedom to develop ideas.
One of the most influential: A Series of Plays in which it is attempted to delineate the stronger passions of the mind (Plays on the Passions) by Joanna Baillie, pre-empting some of the psychological concerns of Wordsworth and Coleridge's Lyrical Ballads Byron developed furthest this form, is more concerned with challenging conventional morality and outlining the paradoxes of orthodox thought, dramas: Manfred, Marino Faliero, Sardanapalus, The Two Foscari, Cain, The Deformed Transformed.
The title of the part of the literary work where the phrase "recollection in tranquility" appears.
on Revisiting the Banks of the Wye during a Tour, 1798, William Wordsworth's work, in the Lyrical Ballads the 'greater Romantic lyric'.
An elegiac poem written by P. B. Shelley and dedicated to John Keats, who died prematurely in 1821.
In William Wordsworth's poem "I Wonder Lonely as a Clout", the poet's source of inspiration; they are seen "fluttering and dancing in the breeze" in big numbers, and they are compared to the stars .
A label applied by conservative literary critics to certain Romantic poets of humble background or progressive political ideas (mainly to Leigh Hunt and Keats).
The label used by the poet Robert Southey to refer to two poets of the younger generation (Byron and Shelley), because he considered their political views progressive / radical.
Excluded from the canon of "high" Romanticism, poets who were identified as "peasants"; often unschooled, they wrote mainly about rural life.
A work by Lord Byron that he started publishing in 1812; following its great success, he declared: "I awoke one morning and found myself famous".
According to William Wordsworth, "a man speaking to men [...] endued with a more lively sensibility, more enthusiasm and tenderness, who has a greater knowledge of human nature, and a more comprehensive soul" than the average.
According to William Wordsworth, "the spontaneous overflow of powerful feelings [which] takes its origin from emotion recollected in tranquility".
In the Preface to this work a great romantic poet established a revolutionary literary manifesto that would determine the philosophical and poetic basis for the Romantic poetry of the period.
The name of a poetic work written by Lord Byron in the Spenserian stanza which tells the story of a man who goes off to travel far and wide because he is disgusted with life's foolish pleasures. The different places that he visits give the poet an opportunity to describe what once happened in them.
The powerful depiction of subjects that are vast, obscure, and powerful; of greatness that is incomparable or unmeasurable. The term is related, for instance, to the Romantic portrayal of nature.
the category of_____________were applied to landscape Edmund Bruke defined it in opposition to the beautiful in his A Philosophical Enquiry into the Origin of Our Ideas of the______ and Beautiful.
it is occasioned by great and terrible objects whereas the beautiful is a product of small and pleasing ones + the picturesque.
the canonical Romantic writers tended to eschew the picturesque appreciation of nature for the full-blooded_______, exemplified by the mountains, crags and torrents of the Lake District and the Alps.
Romantic poets disliked the notion of nature as framed as in a picture, and as mediated by the practitioner of picturesque beauty prefer: a________ and solitary encounter which became a quasi-mystical or, even, religious experience.
It is often seen as a manifesto of Romantic poetry.
In the Preface to this work a great romantic poet established a revolutionary literary manifesto that would determine the philosophical and poetic basis for the Romantic poetry of the period; the 'Preface' defends the poets' use of the 'language really used by men' and the rustic nature of their subjects was published anonymously, then under Wordsworth's name.
Contains much quintessential Romantic poetry - Coleridge, Wordsworth.
Romantic poetry engaged in one way or another with the debate (on Britain and French Revolution), it eschews a concern with fashionable life, featuring, instead, subjects from common life which could be found in every village.
Wordsworth affirmed that it is written in the language of ordinary men.
Wordsworth and Coleridge’s__________can also be read as a response to the changing conditions of rural life; it takes as their subject 'low and rustic life'.
Cynical, alienated and solitary ___________(main character) wandering aroundEurope and the Levant, musing moodily on the wastes of time and the vanity of human aspiration.
William Blake's experiment a new method, most of his books of poems is with this 'technology'; a variety of printing famously used by one of the canonical Romantic English poets, consisting in accompanying the poem's text with visual illustration.
in S.T. Coleridge's The Rime of the Ancient Mariner, the seabird around which the poem's symbolism revolves.
it is thus antithetical to 18th-century neo-classicism, rather than a continuation of already established literary and artistic trends.
it is defined in terms of a move from the outer to the inner, and the growth of a new self-consciousness in literary writing combining a stylistic concern with metaphor and symbol.
for other critics: works written and published or read in the period 1780-1835.
the canonical British _________ poets are the six male poets: William Blake, William Wordsworth, Samuel Taylor Coleridge (first generation), Percy Bysshe Shelley, John Keats, Lord Byron (second generation) - they formed a literary and artistic movement known as , which marked a profound shift in sensibility.
mark a violent reaction against 18th-century Enlightenment thought with its emphasis on 'reason' as the predominant human faculty the root of_________ is in the word 'romance' and have gestured to the period's enourmous interest in, and its revival of, the medieval English ballad.
Characteristics: affirm the creative power of the imagination introduce us to a new way of looking at Nature, which becomes the main subject of their work the possibility of transcendence or 'unity of being' can be achieved through communion with Nature poets' works exhibit a preference for Nature in its sublime aspects: mountains, glaciers, chasms, storms strange and exotic settings poets tend to explain human society and its development in terms of an organic model (model borrowed from Nature) they reject materialist and mechanistic philosophies poets write about the nature of the individual self and the value of individual experience the thought shows a high regard for the figure of the artist, who is variously described as sage (=wise), philosopher, prophet and religious saviour.
of Byron and Shelley, Robert Southey, in the Quarterly Review, had identified Byron and Percy Shelley as constituting the of poetry; Legh Hunt as well.
Thomas De Quincey's writing on Wordsworth, Coleridge and Southey were collected as .
the most accomplished prose stylist of the period, journalist, essayist, novelist and autobiography, Tait and Blackwood’s magazines his essay: ‘On the Knocking on the Gate in Macbeth’, ‘On Murder as One of the Fine Arts’ his writings on Wordsworth, Coleridge and Southey were collected as Recollections of the Lakes and the Lake Poets.
Song of Innocence; Songs of Innocence and of Experience – Blake’s concern with the dialectic of two stages of life, innocence and experience, through which the individual must pass, has come to be regarded as a deeply Romantic notion famous lyrics: ‘London’, The Tyger, The Chimney Sweeper + poems: The Fly, The Lamb, Holy Thursday prophecies: Europe and America epics: The Four Zoas, Milton and Jerusalem.
Coleridge's work - uncompleted.
he was known for his contribution to the 18th century vogue for Oriental romance; his Arabian verse epic, Thalaba the Destroyer set a fashion for such verse tales.
William Blake castigated social evils and political repression include: 'Chimney Sweeper', 'Holy Thursday', 'London' Blake argued that both the states of a child-like and giving Innocence, and of an adult selfishness and materialist Experience, are necessary to human development, although the world is currently dominated by cold and hypocritical materialists (personified by Blake's mythological figure Urizen), there is a possibility that revolutionary energies may break out and imaginatively transform the world.
Perce Shelley's poem, envisions the autumnal wind as a cleansing force, removing the diseased and corrupt, and transforming the world for a new spring and awakening.
throughout the Romantic period the notion of '_______ ', or the more effecient management and cultivation of land to increase its profitability, become a key concern was something that many viewed with suspicion as an index of disordered moral values .
The powerful depiction of subjects that are vast, obscure, and powerful; of greatness that is incomparable or unmeasurable. The term is related, for instance, to the Romantic portrayal of nature the category of sublime were applied to landscape Edmund Bruke defined it in opposition to the in his A Philosophical Enquiry into the Origin of Our Ideas of the Sublime and _______.
Byron's oriental tales - 1813, 'Turkish Tale', first of Byron's Eastern Tales Romantic verse narrative, major characters:________ , Hassan, Leila has been variously interpreted as a poem about the clash of world-views between Muslim and Christian and their struggle over the contested territory of Greece tells the tale of the flight of the _______ , or 'Infidel', from the court of a Turkish despot, Hassan he has had an affair with Leila, one of the woman in Hassan's harem; Hassan has Leila sewn into a sack and drowned he takes revenge and kills Hassan, but gains no peace, goes to a monastery, he remains alienated but haunted by visions of Hassan's severed hand.
Byron's oriental tales- 1814.
on Revisiting the Banks of the Wye during a Tour, 1798, William Wordsworth's work, in the Lyrical Ballads the 'greater Romantic lyric'.
Wordsworth: Preface - two terms, contrasted what the could do as a benefactor of humanity with what the__________ could, whose vocation it was to "bind tobether by passion and knowledge the vast empire of human society,".
romantic period - form of writing; the_____'s appeal for an up-market, metropolitan readership.
some of the poets’ plays were composed to be read rather than performed; Byron’s Manfred + Percy Shelley’s Prometheus Unbound.
William Blake's poem; songs of innocence; about a child and adult; doubleness, meaning is unfixed; hyper-simplicity.
William Blake's poem; songs of experience; pair poem of another, doubleness; groan, weep; multiple dialectics; life - contrasts.
William Blake's poem; long poem; simplicity of rhyme, metre, repeated structure, questions; double configuration, rebounding images.
William Blake's "Four Mighty Ones" - chief powers and component aspects of humanity (Universal Man is divided into: Four MO).
William Blake's "Four Mighty Ones" - pastoral condition of easy and relaxed innocence.
William Blake's "Four Mighty Ones" - the realm of common human experience, suffering, conflicting contraries.
William Blake's "Four Mighty Ones" - Blake's hell.
William Blake's method to express contrastive pairs, Sons of Innocence and Experience, form and content opposite.
William Wordsworth's Lyrical Ballads - outline a critical program that proided a retroactive tationale for the "experiments" the poems represented.
William Wordsworth's poem; ryhming couplet, loneliness is cured by daffodils, joy and unity with nature; explore nature.
William Wordsworth's poem; a pair of lines in poetry that rhyme and usually have the same rhythm.
William Wordsworth's long poem (Tintern Abbey); iambic pentametre + unrhymed lines.
which required the poet to arrange matters so that the poem's subject and its level of diction conformed to the status of the literary kind on the poetic scale (poetic hiearchy - epic, tragedy; comedy, satire, pastoral; short lyric) - Wordsword denied it in his Preface.
Samuel Talyor Coleridge's poem, one of the poems included in the Lyrical Ballads by Wordsworth; about a person's strange story when he was sailing with his mate, symbols: weather, moon, stars, Sun, Albatros, colours; religios - supernatural - spiritual.
Precy Bysshe Shelley's poem Ode to the West Wind rest on this; the principle where by an object or an actin or an emotion is redefined in terms of something else.
John Keat's poem.
Ode to a Grecian Urn.
To Autumn.
The title of an essay by Shelley and a fellow student; its publication caused them to be expelled from their Oxford college.
In William Wordsworth's poem "I Wonder Lonely as a Clout", the poet's source of inspiration; they are seen "fluttering and dancing in the breeze" in big numbers, and they are compared to the stars.
The name of a poet who was drowned a month before his thirtieth birthday in a boating accident in the Bay of Lerici off the coast of Italy.
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