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Unit 5. Living in a pool

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Título del test:
Unit 5. Living in a pool

Descripción:
Inglés (TSEAS)

Autor:
Alejandro Priego
(Otros tests del mismo autor)

Fecha de Creación:
21/12/2020

Categoría:
Deportes

Número preguntas: 26
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Temario:
In order to keep the water in a suitable condition is important (select the incorrect option): To test daily the pH levels. To keep all the filters and the skimmers clean. To ensure that all water pumps work properly. To get a perfect streamline position before entering the water.
A swimmer who competes in distances under 50m needs: To develop his or her levels of oxygen. To develop his or her strength and speed. To develop his or her levels of oxygen and seep. To develop his or her speed.
The correct order of an individual medley is: Backstroke, breaststroke, butterfly and crawl. Butterfly, backstroke, breaststroke and crawl. Crawl, butterfly, backstroke and breaststroke. Breaststroke, backstroke, butterfly and crawl.
The correct order of a medley relay is: Crawl, butterfly, backstroke and breaststroke. Backstroke, breaststroke, butterfly and crawl. Breaststroke, backstroke, butterfly and crawl. Butterfly, backstroke, breaststroke and crawl.
Competition where a swimmer combines four different styles following a specific order: Hydrodynamic. Individual medley. Buoyancy. Race.
Hydrodynamic body position that minimises water friction: Turbidity. Backstroke turn indicator. Streamline. Underwater turn indicator.
In swimming, the specific technique to enter water: Dive start. Kick. Entry. Medley.
Specific movement of arms usually repeated in swimming: Kick. Breathing-out. Stroke. Glide.
A stroke in swimming in which both arms are raised out of the water and lifted forwards together: Butterfly. Breaststroke. Backstroke. Crawl.
A swimming race in which competitors may use any stroke: Medley relay. Medley. Freestyle. Crawl.
The pool _______ we swam yesterday was the deepest in Britain. Which. Whose. That. Where.
I've lost the sports magazine _______ I was reading. That. Who. Whom. Whose.
The injured swimmer _______ the doctor treated had broken his leg when jumping from the starting platform. Whose. Which. Who. Whom.
He's the man _______ son is the freestyle winner. Who. That. Whose. Whom.
The city council honoured the swimmers _______ won the competition. That. Which. Whom. Whose.
When referring to a person, if the noun is the subject of the clause, the pronoun is: Which. Who. Whom. Whose.
We use defining or identifying relative clauses: To give information that can be omitted without causing confusion. To give essential information about someone or something. To introduce information about other people or things. To give extra information about someone or something.
We use non-defining relative clauses: To give essential information about someone or something. To give extra information about someone or something. To define or identify the person or thing we are talking about. To tell which noun we are talking about.
If two things or two people are equal in some aspect, we use: A comparative and the particle than (e.g. bigger than). The structure so ? as (e.g. so big as). c. The structure as ? as (e.g. as big as). Two comparatives and the linking word and (e.g. bigger and bigger).
The silver medal is _______ the gold medal. Not as heavy as. Heaviest as. Not heavy as. Heavier as.
Sofia's hair is _______ than my hair. (long) More long. Most long. Longest. Longer.
This book is _______ that one. Interestinger than. Interestingest than. As interesting than. More interesting than.
We use superlative: To make comparisons. To give extra information about someone or something. To express that something or someone is changing. To describe an object or a person that has the most of a particular quality within a group or of their kind.
The superlative form of polite is: The most polite. Both forms (the politest and the most polite) are correct. The politest. Polite is a superlative form.
Select the superlative form of fast: Most fast. Faster. Fastest. More fast.
Select the superlative form of good: Most good. Gooder. Best. Goodest.
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